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Kummeli V

Kummeli V

  • Director: ALEKSI MÄKELÄ
  • DOP: PINI HELLSTEDT
  • Production Companies: NUMMELA FILMI & PORKKANA RYHMÄ
  • Post Production: POST CONTROL
  • Visual Effects: TROLL VFX

Having been a fan of Kummeli, a group of Finnish comedians, since childhood, getting to work on their latest film was a sort of a dream come true project for me. I love working on stuff that’s both zany and cool, and Kummeli is certainly both.

I was responsible for a number of VFX elements detailed below and conformed the whole project with Vesa Jokinen using Hiero.


The film opened with a scene that’s sort of a movie within a movie, supposedly a super-cheesy fantasy-scifi-adventure done a shoestring budget. Our work needed to reflect that while still remaining technically competent.

For the grand opening shot I contributed the simulated flags fluttering in the wind and the smoke elements, which were then comped together by Vesa Jokinen. Matte was done by Jussi Lehtiniemi with some help from Erkko Huhtamäki and pterodactyls by Mikko Monto. Maya’s nCloth is a fine tool for and almost never explodes, which is something I can’t say of many cloth simulators.

 


The opening scene also called for an “energy-shield” effect, which I created as a generic displacing texture in LightWave, mixing a bunch of procedurals together. Vesa Jokinen then composited the shield into a number of shots and added rest of the elements.

 


The spaceship Uranus (hehe) shots were without a doubt the most challenging for us and required a great deal of work to pull off right, which I think shows in the final film. And who doesn’t love spaceships anyway?

My contributions to the shots were minor but maybe somewhat interesting. All those asteroids you see? They’re all photoscanned from rocks found in the garden in front of the Heureka science center in Vantaa. Despite my poor photos the scans turned out fine and with some fixing from Erkko Huhtamäki were ready to be used in the scene.

 


In addition to above, I did a few required miscellaneous bits and pieces, like the stars and the planet that appear briefly on a screen.